Liquidating business definition


31-Mar-2020 02:26

liquidating business definition-16

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In most legal systems, only fixed security takes precedence over all claims; security by way of floating charge may be postponed to the preferential creditors.

Claimants with non-monetary claims against the company may be able to enforce their rights against the company.

The parties which are entitled by law to petition for the compulsory liquidation of a company vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction, but generally, a petition may be lodged with the court for the compulsory liquidation of a company by: A "just and equitable" winding-up enables the grounds to subject the strict legal rights of the shareholders to equitable considerations.

It can take account of personal relationships of mutual trust and confidence in small parties, particularly, for example, where there is a breach of an understanding that all of the members may participate in the business, Upon hearing the application, the court may either dismiss the petition or make the order for winding-up.

The court may dismiss the application if the petitioner unreasonably refrains from an alternative course of action.

The court may appoint an official receiver, and one or more liquidators, and has general powers to enable rights and liabilities of claimants and contributories to be settled.

The liquidator has the power of the company and company employees are dismissed.

Property which is in the possession of the company, but which was supplied under a valid retention of title clause will generally have to be returned to the supplier.

Where a voluntary liquidation proceeds as a creditors' voluntary liquidation, a liquidation committee may be appointed.

Where a voluntary winding-up of a company has begun, a compulsory liquidation order is still possible, but the petitioning contributory would need to satisfy the court that a voluntary liquidation would prejudice the contributors.

Liquidation is also sometimes referred to as winding-up or dissolution, although dissolution technically refers to the last stage of liquidation.

The process of liquidation also arises when customs, an authority or agency in a country responsible for collecting and safeguarding customs duties, determines the final computation or ascertainment of the duties or drawback accruing on an entry.

The liquidator may also have to determine whether any payments made by the company or transactions entered into may be voidable as a transaction at an undervalue or an unfair preference.